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Study: Malaysia Worst In The World When It Comes To Carpooling

Is it a surprise?


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Study: Malaysia Worst In The World When It Comes To Carpooling

Malaysians are loners.


Remember when carpooling used to be a thing in Kuala Lumpur, and everyone was encouraging it to reduce the jam?

We don't know what happened between then and now, but apparently, carpooling is no longer the 'in' thing.

That's because a recent survey by the Centre for Governance and Political Studies (Cent-GPS) revealed that Malaysians prefer to drive or commute to work themselves.

Malaysians like to be alone

The survey, cited by The Star Online, revealed that 87.3 per cent of Malaysians in the Klang Valley travel alone in their vehicles, one of the highest single driver commuter rates in the world.

In fact, it's so high, we have even exceeded countries like the United States (66 per cent) and Spain (56 per cent), based on the Cent-GPS survey done in 2018.

Whoa!


The survey also found that only 11.6 per cent travel with one passenger, while 0.9 per cent travel with two other passengers on board.

Oh, this survey does not take into account e-hailing drivers and their passengers.

A total of 5,000 vehicles were reportedly surveyed between 23 to 25 October during the morning rush hour across different parts of the Klang Valley to get the result.

A time for reflection

According to Cent-GPS, Malaysians prefer to drive alone because of comfort and so that they have some alone time to "gather their thoughts, listen to their favourite podcasts or even favourite music".

The other reasons given for driving alone include the parking fee at the LRT or MRT was not too far off than the parking fee charged at their offices and the fact that when initiating carpooling, colleagues often wake up late, which in turn makes the drivers late for work too!


“From our literature review, however, the biggest correlation we find with high levels of single driver commuters is the cost of fuel and toll.

“Frankly, the fairly affordable cost of fuel and toll in Malaysia is not a big enough incentive to urge people to seek a carpooling or public transportation option.

“The cost of fuel and sitting through traffic is just not as big as the cost of having to sit and listen to your colleague complain about the boss.

“Yet, if the government were to increase the cost of toll and fuel, the most affected would be the B40 group, making driving to work alone a luxury afforded by the rich, ” said Cent-GPS in the statement.

What do you guys think? Would you carpool if you're given the chance to?

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