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RD Reviews: A First Look at X-Men: Apocalypse

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RD Reviews: A First Look at X-Men: Apocalypse
Will Bryan Singer finally not disappoint us? (Image: 20th Century Fox)

Let's catch up with the plot

The new X-Men: Apocalypse is set in 1983, and our protagonists are leading different lives after the events in Days of Future Past. Charles Xavier (Professor X) is contented running his School for Gifted Youngsters with Hank McCoy (Beast) helping him; Erik Lehnsherr (Magneto) has a wife and a daughter, and Raven (Mystique) is running around Europe helping other mutants. 

Disrupting their peace is the world's first mutant, En Sabah Nur (Apocalypse), who has woken up from a slumber after thousands of years. He's not about to play nice, and threatens the existence of the world with his powers (you find out yourself when you watch the movie lah). 

So, how's the villain?

Image: 20th Century Fox

Apocalypse is played by the talented Oscar Isaac, who is very much wasted here. His motives aren't even convincing. He’s power hungry and wants to destroy the world. Oooh, how groundbreaking (do note the sarcasm). It’s a shame, because we know he’s better than this robotic role. It seems like the director was more focused on him showcasing his mutant powers, rather than the character himself. 

P.S. Read Rojak Daily's Uncle Raymond's 'interview' with the villain here.

By the way, it's also sort of an origin story

The movie also introduces a young group of mutants you’d recognise from earlier movies: Jean Grey, Scott Summers (Cyclops), and Ororo Munroe (Storm), acting as a sort of origin story for them. That's where things get messy, because not only do these characters have zero chemistry between each other, they're also constantly overshadowed by the main plot. Kudos to Sophie Turner, though, who managed to produce a convincing portrayal as Jean.

Image: 20th Century Fox

Welp. Should we just not bother with this?

Contrary to what everyone and their Mum seem to think, X-Men: Apocalypse isn't too horrible. It’s campy enough to be entertaining, if you walk into the cinema knowing that you could be disappointed yet again by the franchise. The scene transitions weren't too choppy or confusing. James McAvoy (Professor X) plays a great damsel in distress in this one, and as per usual, has more chemistry with Magneto (who is forever IN PAIN) rather than his actual love interest, Agent Moira MacTaggert (Rose Byrne). Jennifer Lawrence shines as Mystique—except we can’t really get Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games out of our minds when she’s going around helping oppressed mutants.

Image: 20th Century Fox 

Magneto doing his emoting (Image: 20th Century Fox)

The best part of the movie

Quicksilver be going, "Me, really?" Yes, really. (Image: 20th Century Fox)

This would hands down go to Peter Maximoff (Quicksilver), a role reprised by Evan Peters. He gets another slow-motion scene similar to X-Men: Days of Future Past. He seems to be the only one who can connect with other characters, and the movie would be less entertaining without him. So can we have a standalone Quicksilver movie, pretty please? 
 

The movie premieres in cinemas nationwide this May 19.
 

Our rating:
 
 
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